Maps

Since Silk uses Google’s API, the values of your location tag should be ‘normal’ addresses that Google Maps can understand. A specific address like ‘3 Abbey Rd, London NW8 9AY, Great Britain’ will be most reliable, but you can also use something more vague like ‘Brooklyn, NY’. You can also use things like country names, towns, or important landmarks.

If you want to use coordinates, you have to use both coordinates in one value, seperating the two coordinates with a comma, like this: ‘52.37306°, 4.89222°’. If you want you can omit the degree symbols (e.g. ‘52.37306, 4.89222’).

If want to use coordinates in a ‘Degrees decimal minutes’ or ‘Degrees minutes seconds’ format, you don’t have to convert them to decimal degrees. Silk will recognise DD / DMS formats with a space or comma separator in between the coordinates.

In the following video we create a map on the Countries of the World Silk site. We add an inline filter to only show countries in Africa on the map. Next, we use the ‘Number plot’ feature to show the life expectancy for each African country on the map. Next, we use the ‘Color by’ to show the goverment types in Africa.

How to create a map

As with all visualizations, maps can be viewed and adjusted on the explore page. Hit the ‘explore’ tab on top of each page and select the map marker icon.

If you’re the owner of the Silk, you can click the green ‘Publish’ button to publish the visualization to your home page or another page.

You can also add a map to your Silk by editing your home page or another page, and use the ‘+’ icon anywhere you want to the map. Select ‘map’ from the ‘visualization’ menu.

Controlling the number of markers

Use the ‘maximum items’ dropdown to specify the number of markers you want to display. To control which markers get displayed or omitted, use the ‘Sort by’ dropdown to sort by a tag.

Using number plots

Use the ‘Number plot’ dropdown to select a tag that has numerical values. This will change the markers in circles. The size of the circles is relative to the value of the tag. If the numerical value fits in the circle, Silk will display it. For an example of number plots, see the video above, or look at this visualization from the Countries of the World Silk.

Color coding number plots

Use the ‘Color by’ dropdown to choose a tag which will be used to color the number plots. The map gets a legend that shows what the different colors mean. Here’s what it looks like:

Mini pie charts

When pages that have the same location have different values for the tag your number plotting, the map marker now shows the distribution of those values in a pie chart. Here’s an example that shows the type of capital punishment being used in the United States:

Adjust what you see on the popup

To adjust what you see on the popup, click the ‘more options’ button when editing or exploring a map, and use the ‘Show on popup’ dropdown.

Filtering map results

Click on the ‘Show all filters’ button in the ‘more options’ menu to access the filter side bar.

Here you can filter your results by text, values that occur often, ranges, and more. Either type the filters into the pre-set filter boxes or click the ‘Add filter’ button and select a new filter from the available tags.

For more information, see the help article on filtering.

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Filtering your charts

Click on the ‘Add filter’ button to filter your data.

You can filter your results by text, values that occur often, ranges, and more. Either type the filters into the pre-set filter boxes or click the ‘Add filter’ button and select a new filter from the available tags.

For more information, see the help article on filtering.

Share and embed visualization

A sharing button is located above every Silk visualization, and on every explore page.

You can share the visualization on Twitter or Facebook. The share link will take people to the exact same page and visualization view that was showing when you clicked the ‘Share’ button.

You can also embed a visualization on your website or blog. Click ‘Share’ then click on the ‘Embed’ button. Copy the embed code to your clipboard. Paste the code into the editor for your website or blog.